My Method of Navigation Planning and Structure - adapted from The Law of Navigation by John C. Maxwell

1. I Plan to plan. Give time for planning and organizing.

2. I Determine your primary purpose. What͛s the big picture? What are you trying to do?

3. I Assess the situation. Understand where you sit before trying to develop a strategy.

4. I Prioritize the needs. Make sure the team agrees on the most important goals.

5. I Ask the right questions. Ask about market, leadership, revenue, reporting, evaluation.

6. I Set specific goals. Write goals that are realistic, measurable, convictional.

7. I Clarify and communicate. Communication links planning and implementation.

8. I Identify possible obstacles. Mentally walk through all you are trying to pull off.

9. I Have an open system approach to your planning. Be sympathetic to your environment.

10. I Schedule everything you can. Get things on the calendar and set deadlines.

11. I Budget everything you can. Determine both the costs and due dates of projects.

12. I Monitor and correct. Progress is like a canoe trip; constantly adjust your course.

13. I Study the results. Evaluation prevents stagnation and exaggeration.

Remember, anyone can steer the ship, but it takes a leader to chart the course - John C. Maxwell

Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life, by Donald S. Whitney

"Commenting on the difference between the disciplined and the undisciplined way, he wrote, Nothing was ever achieved without discipline; and many an athlete and many a man has been ruined because he abandoned discipline and let himself grow slack. 


Coleridge is the supreme tragedy of indiscipline. Never did so great a mind produce so little. He left Cambridge University to join the army; but he left the army; he returned to Oxford and left without a degree. 


He began a paper called The Watchman which lived for ten numbers and then died. It has been said of him: "He lost himself in visions of work to be done, that always remained to be done. Coleridge had every poetic gift but one—the gift of sustained and concentrated effort." 


In his head and in his mind he had all kinds of books. But the books were never composed outside Coleridge's mind, because he would not face the discipline of sitting down to write them out. 


No one ever reached any eminence, and no one having reached it ever maintained it, without discipline." 


from "Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life" by Donald S. Whitney

Segment from ‘Pursue Value Not Goals,’ by Morten Hansen

from "Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More" by Morten Hansen


The value equation hinges on three components. The first of these has to do with how much your work benefits other people or your organization. The phrase "benefits to others" can mean contributing to your department, your office, a colleague, your company, your customers, your clients, or your suppliers (or even to the community or environment). The benefits themselves can take various forms, including enabling others to do their jobs better, helping create new products, or devising better methods for getting work done. 


The second component of value is the quality of your work—the degree of accuracy, insight, novelty, and reliability of your work output. 


The final component of value is how efficiently you work. 


To produce great value at work is to create output that benefits others tremendously and that is done efficiently and with high quality.

The Myth of Learning Styles, by Adam Grant

Your learning style is about how you like to learn, not how you learn best.

Although you might enjoy listening, reading, or doing, there's no compelling evidence that you learn better that way—and sometimes we actually learn more when we're out of our comfort zone.

Plus, many tasks aren't suited to every mode of learning: "You can't visualize a perfect French accent."

Productivity and Purpose, according to Tim Challies

Challies, Tim. Do More Better: A Practical Guide to Productivity. Challies, 2015. Kindle file

Productivity is effectively stewarding your gifts, talents, time, energy, and enthusiasm for the good of others and the glory of God. Productivity calls you to direct your whole life at this great goal of bringing glory to God by doing good for others.- page 16

Your purpose: to glorify God by doing good to others. There is no better plan and no higher ideal. - page 18
 

A Productivity Catechism, by Tim Challies

From: Challies, T. (2015). Do More Better: A Practical Guide to Productivity
Know Your Purpose
A Productivity Catechism An understanding of productivity needs to begin with an understanding of the reason you exist. Productivity is not what will bring purpose to your life, but what will enable you to excel in living out your existing purpose.

I am going to lead you through a brief Productivity Catechism, a series of questions and answers. Only when you understand these foundational matters about your God-given purpose and mission will you be ready to get to work. 

Q1. Ultimately, why did God create you? 
A. God created me to bring glory to him.

Q2. How can you glorify God in your day-to-day life? 
A. I can glorify God in my day-to-day life by doing good works.

Q3. What are good works?
 A. Good works are deeds done for the glory of God and the benefit of other people.Good works, then, are any and all of those deeds you do for the benefit of others.
Q4. But you are a sinful person. Can you actually do good works? 
A. Yes. Christians are able to do good works because of the finished work of Christ.

Q5. In what areas of life should you emphasize good works? 
A. I ought to emphasize good works at all times and in all areas of life.

Q6. What is productivity? 
A. Productivity is effectively stewarding my gifts, talents, time, energy, and enthusiasm for the good of others and the glory of God

What does it mean to glorify God? - Matt Perman

....To glorify God means to give him weight. To give him ultimate significance and centrality in your life and actions.

In other words, to glorify God means to act in ways that show he matters most in each decision you make. It is to have ultimate regard for him in all that you do, coming from love for him.


https://www.whatsbestnext.com/2018/03/mean-glorify-god/

Get Tougher, by Jock Willink

When people think of the words "mind control," they think of people controlling the minds of other people.

Not me. I think about controlling my own mind.

I control it.

How do I do something? DO IT!

How do I get up earlier? GET UP EARLIER!

How do I stop eating sugar? STOP EATING SUGAR!!

How do I work out every day? WORK OUT EVERYDAY!!

It's all about controlling my mind.

It's all about being tougher.

How do I get tougher? BE TOUGHER!!!

I have to have control over my mind. I have to assert it.

I have to decide that I am going to be in control, that I am gone Ng to do what I want to do.

Weakness doesn't get a vote. Laziness doesn't get a vote. Sadness doesn't get a vote. Frustration doesn't get a vote.

Negativity-doesn't-get-a-vote."

- Jock Willink

“Whining and bitching about traffic, weather and slow computer? STOP WHINING AND BITCHING

Traffic a problem? LEAVE EARLIER 

Don’t like the cold weather? MOVE FARTHER SOUTH. 

Weather too hot? MOVE NORTH 

Computer or internet slow? BUY A MORE POWERFUL COMPUTER or GET MORE BAND-WIDTH.

Take ownership of your life.

Someone didn't do something they were supposed to do for you? TAKE OWNERSHIP, LOOK INSIDE YOU. WHAT WORDS WERE YOU SAYING TO YOURSELF AND OTHERS?

STOP LOOKING FOR WAYS TO BE OFFENDED"

- Danny L. Smith