The Way You've Been Taught To Plan is WRONG

I quick research (Google) on “business planning” overall says the same-old-thing…..1 year plans, 3 year plans, even 5 year plans.
 
That worked for Columbus and the Pilgrims. They’d need something, send a courier across the sea to England and 6-8 months later, get it. No big deal if it was another few months, ok. Everything moved slowly.
 
Today’s planning has to be short-term, with shorter-term checks and balances.
 
Today’s business moves FAST.
 
Moran and Lennington have nailed it in their book “The 12 Week Year.” They propose 3 plans:
 
  • 12 week plan that’s carried out through
  • weekly plans carried out with
  • daily plans
 
I could write about the 12 Week Year……but I won’t. For now.
 
There might be a place for long-term planning but I’m not wasting my time imagining where. I get planning. I get putting together some good what-if scenarios. I get having big hairy audacious goals. But that’s not planning. Planning is what we do to prepare to carry out those goals, intentions and aspiration. And planning more than a few weeks is lazy. Pure laziness because the planners know they need to plan, but they know the 1 year plan is useless after a few weeks and thus don’t want to spend much time planning. If I planned like that I wouldn’t blame them, I’d be lazy to. Who wants to spend time planning when it doesn’t work.
 
Who can put together a plan, divide it up into quarters and expect to follow it to any extent?
 
Definitely not an engaging salesperson. It’s getting close to a year that I’ve been using the periodization formula in The 12 Week Year. It’s a game changer and I’m not sure that 12 weeks isn’t too long. Business moves fast. Competitors most fast. New opportunities come at the engaging salesperson and they come FAST.
 
To that end.



 
 
 

My Method of Navigation Planning and Structure - adapted from The Law of Navigation by John C. Maxwell

1. I plan to plan.

2. I determine my primary purpose in each role

3. I assess the situation.

4. I prioritize the needs.

5. I ask questions.

6. I set specific goals.

7. I clarify and communicate.

8. I identify possible obstacles.

9. I plan no more than twelve weeks.

10. I schedule everything I can.

11. I budget everything I can.

12. I measure lead and lag indicators.

13. I study the results and make corrections where necessary.

14. I do less and obsess.

Remember, anyone can steer the ship, but it takes a leader to chart the course - John C. Maxwell

Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life, by Donald S. Whitney

"Commenting on the difference between the disciplined and the undisciplined way, he wrote, Nothing was ever achieved without discipline; and many an athlete and many a man has been ruined because he abandoned discipline and let himself grow slack. 


Coleridge is the supreme tragedy of indiscipline. Never did so great a mind produce so little. He left Cambridge University to join the army; but he left the army; he returned to Oxford and left without a degree. 


He began a paper called The Watchman which lived for ten numbers and then died. It has been said of him: "He lost himself in visions of work to be done, that always remained to be done. Coleridge had every poetic gift but one—the gift of sustained and concentrated effort." 


In his head and in his mind he had all kinds of books. But the books were never composed outside Coleridge's mind, because he would not face the discipline of sitting down to write them out. 


No one ever reached any eminence, and no one having reached it ever maintained it, without discipline." 


from "Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life" by Donald S. Whitney

Segment from ‘Pursue Value Not Goals,’ by Morten Hansen

from "Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More" by Morten Hansen


The value equation hinges on three components. The first of these has to do with how much your work benefits other people or your organization. The phrase "benefits to others" can mean contributing to your department, your office, a colleague, your company, your customers, your clients, or your suppliers (or even to the community or environment). The benefits themselves can take various forms, including enabling others to do their jobs better, helping create new products, or devising better methods for getting work done. 


The second component of value is the quality of your work—the degree of accuracy, insight, novelty, and reliability of your work output. 


The final component of value is how efficiently you work. 


To produce great value at work is to create output that benefits others tremendously and that is done efficiently and with high quality.

The Myth of Learning Styles, by Adam Grant

Your learning style is about how you like to learn, not how you learn best.

Although you might enjoy listening, reading, or doing, there's no compelling evidence that you learn better that way—and sometimes we actually learn more when we're out of our comfort zone.

Plus, many tasks aren't suited to every mode of learning: "You can't visualize a perfect French accent."

What is the lowest credit score for USDA?

The lowest credit score a person can have on a USDA loan is 640.
 
To clarify, that’s the lowest of the three scores normally used pulled in a Mortgage Credit Report (MCR).
 
If there are only two scores available, then it’s the lowest of the two scores used for underwriting.
 
****Remember, guidelines change. Check with your lender for current information or contact Danny.